Latest Posts

is dead, says security expert at Symantec

Antivirus software only catches 45% of malware attacks and is “dead”, according to a senior manager at Symantec. Remarks by Brian Dye, senior vice-president for...

What can I do if Windows won’t run my old software, such as Quicken 2002?

I’ve been running Intuit’s Quicken for years: my current version is 2002 Deluxe. It runs fine under Windows 7, but I haven’t tried it...

Faulty computer software could have led to Chinook crash, report claims

Faulty computer software could have led to a Chinook helicopter crash that killed 25 of Britain's top intelligence experts, it was reported today. An internal...

10 signs a career in coding and software development might be right for you

In recent tests to assess the knowledge and skills of 15-year-olds from across the world, the UK ranked 26th for maths and 20th for...

is dead, says security expert at Symantec

Antivirus software only catches 45% of malware attacks and is “dead”, according to a senior manager at Symantec.

Remarks by Brian Dye, senior vice-president for information security at the company, which invented commercial antivirus software in the 1980s and now develops and sells Norton Antivirus, suggest that such software leaves users vulnerable.

32b8c175-659b-4b1e-bd09-515a94973501-2060x1236

Dye told the Wall Street Journal that hackers increasingly use novel methods and bugs in the software of computers to perform attacks, resulting in about 55% cyberattacks going unnoticed by commercial antivirus software.

Malware has become increasingly complex in a post-Stuxnet world. Computer viruses range from relatively simple criminal attacks, where credit card information is targeted, to espionage programs that spy on users and data but can easily be upgraded into cyberweapons at the touch of a button, according to security expert Eugene Kaspersky, founder of Kaspersky Lab, which also sells antivirus software.

From protect to ‘detect and respond’
That failure to detect issues is forcing Symantec, which has a turnover of about $1.6bn (£590m) and an 8% global antivirus marketshare – according to data from the enterprise software company Opswat – to diversify its products, moving into the “detect and respond” sector rather than the simple “protect” segment.

The switch to the detect and respond paradigm means tracking data leaks, hacks and other intrusions and preventing further repercussions from stolen data. For users, that means changing passwords, but for businesses that often means stopping access to accounts and services that have been subject to data loss or infiltration, as well as tracking the source of the intrusion and shoring up cyberdefences – something governments have been doing with new cyber response teams.

Antivirus still accounts for 40% of the company’s revenue, however, and while other security companies such as Kasperky and Intel’s McAfee have already moved in that direction, Symantec lags the movement.

Latest Posts

is dead, says security expert at Symantec

Antivirus software only catches 45% of malware attacks and is “dead”, according to a senior manager at Symantec. Remarks by Brian Dye, senior vice-president for...

What can I do if Windows won’t run my old software, such as Quicken 2002?

I’ve been running Intuit’s Quicken for years: my current version is 2002 Deluxe. It runs fine under Windows 7, but I haven’t tried it...

Faulty computer software could have led to Chinook crash, report claims

Faulty computer software could have led to a Chinook helicopter crash that killed 25 of Britain's top intelligence experts, it was reported today. An internal...

10 signs a career in coding and software development might be right for you

In recent tests to assess the knowledge and skills of 15-year-olds from across the world, the UK ranked 26th for maths and 20th for...

Don't Miss

CHINA BANS NORTH KOREA TOURISM ONE DAY BEFORE TRUMP ARRIVES

one day before President Donald Trump arrives in China as a part of his Asian tour, u. S. Has banned tourism to North Korea,...

This excursion, take a ride to N. Korea

North Korea’s tourism business enterprise has released a website offering vacation alternatives starting from browsing to rice planting, despite sturdy U.S. Warnings to avoid...

What To Look For In Screen Recording Software

The screen recording software that is available nowadays runs the gamut between the most basic of recorders to advanced tools with lots of options....

Excursion operators brace for Donald Trump travel crackdown

U.S. Excursion operators that send Americans to Cuba are banding together to attempt to restriction harm to business from tighter regulations on tour to...

Last Americans rush to North Korea ahead of journey ban

Pyongyang, North Korea (CNN)A looming US journey ban has brought about some bold American globetrotters to rapid-tune their holidays to North Korea. Beginning September 1,...

Stay in touch

To be updated with all the latest news, offers and special announcements.